Info and Links

Info on wildflower meadows:

The wildflower meadows that we know and love are actually classified as types of grassland habitat. Grasslands have existed for a long time, and are quite likely to be an ancient form of habitat. It is possible that the first grasslands were created by huge grazing herbivores thousands of years ago when most of the UK was covered in woodland. Since then, woodland areas reduced in size and grassland areas expanded as humans cut down trees for fuel and materials, and managed the left over grassland for livestock and agriculture.

Grasslands in the UK have suffered severely in the past 70 years or so and a huge proportion of the wildflowers that were once abundant have disappeared. These wildflowers are a fantastic source of food and shelter to a vast array of bugs and other animals and so it is imperative that we start acting quickly to conserve our existing meadows, and work to increase the wildflowers we have in the UK.

Wildflower meadows are great wildlife habitats to create in urban areas as they can help to create a stunning range of colourful plants for people to enjoy, whilst at the same time providing important resources for local wildlife.

 

Links:

 

  • For information on Urban Roots and the gardening work and woodland work they do with the community in and around Toryglen, as well as learning more about the history of the meadow site, please see their website: http://www.urbanroots.org.uk/

 

  • For more information on the Toryglen Community Base and the resources they have, including Childcare, Youth Projects and Benefits Advice, see their website: http://www.toryglen.org.uk/index.html

 

  • For some fascinating information on wildflowers and wildflower meadows and what they are all about, see these two links:

http://www.plantlife.org.uk/scotland/campaigns/keeping_the_wild_in_wildflower/

http://www.floralocale.org/Grassland+creation+and+floral+enhancement

 

A bumblebee foraging on Creeping Thistle at the meadow site.

A bumblebee foraging on Creeping Thistle at the meadow site.

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